SHINING A LIGHT ON
PSEUDOBULBAR AFFECT.

LAUGHING AT A FUNERAL. CRYING UNCONTROLLABLY FOR NO REASON.

It’s hard to understand if you don’t know that it could be Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) – a neurological condition involving involuntary, sudden and frequent episodes of laughing or crying.

FACTS ABOUT PBA

PBA is often undiagnosed.

Two million people in the U.S. know they have PBA, but more than 9 million are estimated to be living with the condition.*

Few know.

53 percent of stroke survivor respondents report symptoms of PBA, but fewer than 1 in 5 know about PBA.

Six common neurological conditions are most associated with PBA:

  • Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
  • Alzheimer’s/Dementia
  • Stroke
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Lou Gehrig’s Disease (ALS)
  • Parkinson’s Disease

 

PBA IS OFTEN MISUNDERSTOOD AND MISDIAGNOSED – BUT IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE.

Awareness, education and treatment can help people better manage PBA in everyday life. Find information and resources to help.

BUILDING AWARENESS

Pseudobulbar Affect Voices (PBA Voices) is dedicated to building awareness of PBA and to helping providers diagnose, track, and treat the disease. Learn more today.

*When considering patients with any of 6 common neurologic conditions associated with PBA, it is estimated that 37%, or an estimated 7.1 million Americans, have symptoms suggestive of PBA as defined by a CNS-LS (Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale) score ≥13 and 9.4% of patients, or an estimated 1.8 million Americans, with CNS-LS scores ≥21. The presence of PBA symptoms was defined as a CNS-LS score ≥13 and a more restrictive definition was also evaluated using CNS-LS ≥21. The CNS-LS was validated as a PBA screening tool in ALS and MS populations. A CNS-LS score ≥13 merits further diagnostic assessment.